Posts tagged "africa"
dynamicafrica:




AMAA (Africa Movie Academy Awards) is now calling for entries for the 2013 edition to be held in April next year. The deadline for submissions is 30 December 2012 and nominations will be announced in the first week of March.
Acceptable genres include feature length films, shorts and documentary entries. Only films produced, premiered and or released between December 2011 and November 2012 are eligible. Features may not exceed 120 minutes and shorts should not be longer than 40 minutes.
Enter your film (you need to be logged in) at: http://www.ama-awards.com/node/add/films
“There is this great awareness of the possibilities in Africa. This has been an exciting year for African cinema as many big budget productions have been produced on the continent and distribution is becoming more accessible to African films,” says AMAA founder Academy CEO Peace Anyiam-Osigwe.
The winning films for AMAA 2012 included How to Steal Two Million, Otelo Burning, and Shattered.
Since its inception in 2005, AMAA has established itself as the most prestigious and glamorous awards celebrating filmmaking on the continent. The gala event, which is televised live around the world, attracts Hollywood celebrities alongside their African counterparts, as well as African politicians and media.
Enter your film at http://www.ama-awards.com/node/add/films

dynamicafrica:

AMAA (Africa Movie Academy Awards) is now calling for entries for the 2013 edition to be held in April next year. The deadline for submissions is 30 December 2012 and nominations will be announced in the first week of March.

Acceptable genres include feature length films, shorts and documentary entries. Only films produced, premiered and or released between December 2011 and November 2012 are eligible. Features may not exceed 120 minutes and shorts should not be longer than 40 minutes.

Enter your film (you need to be logged in) at: http://www.ama-awards.com/node/add/films

“There is this great awareness of the possibilities in Africa. This has been an exciting year for African cinema as many big budget productions have been produced on the continent and distribution is becoming more accessible to African films,” says AMAA founder Academy CEO Peace Anyiam-Osigwe.

The winning films for AMAA 2012 included How to Steal Two Million, Otelo Burning, and Shattered.

Since its inception in 2005, AMAA has established itself as the most prestigious and glamorous awards celebrating filmmaking on the continent. The gala event, which is televised live around the world, attracts Hollywood celebrities alongside their African counterparts, as well as African politicians and media.

Enter your film at http://www.ama-awards.com/node/add/films

dynamicafrica:

DYNAMIC AFRICANS:  Abdirashid of ‘Somali Times’
In an effort to break down and deconstruct the complexities of his home country of Somalia and Somali identity within the diaspora, Dynamic African blogger Abdirashid of ‘Somali Times’ covers all aspects of Somali culture, politics and history through his tumblr blog, as well as providing essential and opinionated comments about these very topics.

Tell us a little about yourself:
My name is Abdirashid and I’m originally from Somalia, East Africa. I’m 25 years old and I’ve been living here in the Netherlands since 1991. I do however feel a connection to my heritage. I’m currently finishing my studies in tourism and the leisure industry. I hope to focus on the Somali region in the future.
Where does the inspiration behind the url of your blog come from?
Somalis are known to be pastoralists and nomads. Of course there are many Somalis who live in urban cities, but the nomadic lifestyle is part of the Somali essence. I thought it would be fitting to use the word nomad in my blog name. Amsterdam is a given.
What inspired or motivated you to start this blog and when did you start it?
I know from my studies how important (and dangerous) representation of a people can be. I felt that Somalis were never shed in a positive light or even more nuanced in the media. We are not just pirates, warlords,  poverty stricken, war loving people and terrorists. I wanted to create a blog to share the beauty of our culture, developments and to showcase my narrative. I wanted to showcase our side of Africa and to do my bit in sharing the diversity of the huge continent.


Another motivation was that I felt Somalis around me didn’t have much knowledge about our culture or history. Many young Somalis I know only feel proud of Islamic or Arab history, which made me wonder how we lost our Somali pride and love for our history and culture. Our dances, poems, songs, proverbs, freedom fighters etc. Before the war we were a promising hard working people on our way to become a developed nation. With clean beautiful cities and a growing middle class. A proud tolerant people that emphasized on culture and religion, without losing any of our identities.
We’re about 99% Muslim and we even had one of the largest cathedrals of Africa next to a mosque. Even though we have been in a limbo for the last 21 years because of the civil conflict. The war does not define us. I started blogging in August 2012.
How would you describe your experience as both a Somali living in the diaspora, as well as identifying with the greater context of the ‘African diaspora’?
As a Somali in the diaspora I know it is expected of me to contribute to the rebuilding of the nation. I feel people here do not want to see the diversity of black people. We are categorized as the same as all other black people no matter where they’re from. I have never experienced much racism here, but I don’t see this country as mine. I do feel a stronger connection with people from other countries in the Horn of Africa, such as Djibouti, Ethiopia and Eritrea. But this has to do with our interwoven history. Pan Africanism or identifying with the African diaspora is not something rooted in the Somali culture, but pan Somalism is.
Any similar blogs you’d like to recommend?vintagesomalia.tumblr.com

dynamicafrica:

DYNAMIC AFRICANS: Abdirashid of ‘Somali Times’

In an effort to break down and deconstruct the complexities of his home country of Somalia and Somali identity within the diaspora, Dynamic African blogger Abdirashid of ‘Somali Times’ covers all aspects of Somali culture, politics and history through his tumblr blog, as well as providing essential and opinionated comments about these very topics.

Tell us a little about yourself:

My name is Abdirashid and I’m originally from Somalia, East Africa. I’m 25 years old and I’ve been living here in the Netherlands since 1991. I do however feel a connection to my heritage. I’m currently finishing my studies in tourism and the leisure industry. I hope to focus on the Somali region in the future.


Where does the inspiration behind the url of your blog come from?

Somalis are known to be pastoralists and nomads. Of course there are many Somalis who live in urban cities, but the nomadic lifestyle is part of the Somali essence. I thought it would be fitting to use the word nomad in my blog name. Amsterdam is a given.


What inspired or motivated you to start this blog and when did you start it?

I know from my studies how important (and dangerous) representation of a people can be. I felt that Somalis were never shed in a positive light or even more nuanced in the media. We are not just pirates, warlords,  poverty stricken, war loving people and terrorists. I wanted to create a blog to share the beauty of our culture, developments and to showcase my narrative. I wanted to showcase our side of Africa and to do my bit in sharing the diversity of the huge continent.



Another motivation was that I felt Somalis around me didn’t have much knowledge about our culture or history. Many young Somalis I know only feel proud of Islamic or Arab history, which made me wonder how we lost our Somali pride and love for our history and culture. Our dances, poems, songs, proverbs, freedom fighters etc. Before the war we were a promising hard working people on our way to become a developed nation. With clean beautiful cities and a growing middle class. A proud tolerant people that emphasized on culture and religion, without losing any of our identities.

We’re about 99% Muslim and we even had one of the largest cathedrals of Africa next to a mosque. Even though we have been in a limbo for the last 21 years because of the civil conflict. The war does not define us.

I started blogging in August 2012.


How would you describe your experience as both a Somali living in the diaspora, as well as identifying with the greater context of the ‘African diaspora’?

As a Somali in the diaspora I know it is expected of me to contribute to the rebuilding of the nation. I feel people here do not want to see the diversity of black people. We are categorized as the same as all other black people no matter where they’re from. I have never experienced much racism here, but I don’t see this country as mine. I do feel a stronger connection with people from other countries in the Horn of Africa, such as Djibouti, Ethiopia and Eritrea. But this has to do with our interwoven history. Pan Africanism or identifying with the African diaspora is not something rooted in the Somali culture, but pan Somalism is.


Any similar blogs you’d like to recommend?
vintagesomalia.tumblr.com

ourafrica:

African “Meet up”http://www.ourafricablog.com/meetup

Design-a-logo contest - http://www.ourafricablog.com/logo

Job Opportunities - http://www.ourafricablog.com/jobs

Colleges, college students and/or other  Organizations - http://www.ourafricablog.com/OAB

dynamicafrica:

The Sharing Day - African Film Initiative on Blip

Directed by Tsitsi Dangarembga (Zimbabwe). Produced by TVE for UNICEF.

Ten-year old Tabitha is an HIV positive orphan who lives with her Mainini (a Shona word for aunt) in a village in Zimbabwe. But embittered at being abandoned by her husband and worn out by the daily struggle to survive in Zimbabwe’s economic crisis, Mainini neglects Tabitha, and crucially fails to feed her the nutritious diet she needs to cope with her HIV status.

As Tabitha’s health deteriorates, her school friend Tino and Tino’s mother’s concerns grow, and they do their best to take care of her.

Tragically, their help comes too late. But it does have one redeeming outcome, helping to bring together and energies the village community to help its most vulnerable members.

At the height of Tsitsi Dangarembga’s memorable drama, singer and actor Plaxedes Wenyika’s powerful delivery of the song ‘Shingira’, helps underline the everyday heroism of ordinary people - teachers, doctors or health professionals - taking positive action to keep children like Tabitha alive, in spite of the harsh economic and political conditions in Zimbabwe today.

ourafrica:

we want to show case your work on this site/blog for free.

Nothing like working together to help promote and better ourselves.

The site has over 8,000 readers around the world, you never know who is reading and how they can help you out.

From scholars to models, from inventors to designers. It does not matter if it’s you, a friend or a teacher. You can submit your work, and/or a short summary and picture of yourself [or the person] and their work or accomplishments!

Contact us via E-mail:

OABsubmit@gmail.com

b-sama:

The Innovation Hubs of Africa
This great graphic by the guys at Mhealth Africa illustrates where innovation hubs are popping up across the continent

b-sama:

The Innovation Hubs of Africa

This great graphic by the guys at Mhealth Africa illustrates where innovation hubs are popping up across the continent

(via praisethelorde-deactivated20141)

Congratulations to Corinne Stevie, winner of the AB Logo Contest! Thanks to all who submitted!

Congratulations to Corinne Stevie, winner of the AB Logo Contest! Thanks to all who submitted!

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