babybutta:

dynastylnoire:

nyamennwunamawu:

takeonthestorm:

gang0fwolves:

thelastblackman:

No future at Hampton University

Hampton University bans dreadlocks and cornrows (MBA program).


brainwash,                 institutionalize,           sellout,  

self-hatred,      stupid                     ignorant         culturally ignorant

                                  racism                  black on black  

I am re-blogging this because just knowing about it is not enough, contact information for Hampton University. Do what Malcolm would have done

757-727-5000 

because being black is seen as being unprofessional

Because Hampton aint the real HU.

Oop.

^^

because new black was never new

THIS IS A FUCKING MESSAGE TO WHITE PEOPLE WANTING TO DO LOCS AND BE APART OF THE NATURAL HAIR MOVEMENT.

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public 
BGLH writes:
“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.
“WOW. Really?” I replied.
I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.
With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.
Read more here.

heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public

BGLH writes:

“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.

“WOW. Really?” I replied.

I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.

With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.

Read more here.

(via dynamicafrica)

dynamicafrica:

Speakers For The Dead: Documentary about the original black settlers of Priceville, Ontario Canada.

When Irish settlers first moved to the area now known as Priceville in Ontario Canada, to their surprise, they found a community of black people already living there.

This documentary reveals some of the hidden history of black people in Canada.

In the 1930s in rural Ontario, a farmer buried the tombstones of a black cemetery to make way for a potato patch. In the 1980s, descendants of the original settlers, Black and White, came together to restore the cemetery, but there were hidden truths no one wanted to discuss.

Deep racial wounds were opened. Scenes of the cemetery excavation, interviews with residents and re-enactments—including one of a baseball game where a broken headstone is used for home plate—add to the film’s emotional intensity.

By Jennifer Holness, & David Sutherland, 2000

wocinsolidarity:

lightspeedsound:

Bethann Hardison on racism in the fashion industry.

From About Face: Supermodels then and now

"the word aesthetic is borderline racist at this point"

(via yrmomschesthair)

Social scientists estimate that 15 to 30 percent, or, “[a]s many as 600,000 to 1.2 million slaves” in antebellum America were Muslims. 46 percent of the slaves in the antebellum South were kidnapped from Africa’s western regions, which boasted “significant numbers of Muslims”.

These enslaved Muslims strove to meet the demands of their faith, most notably the Ramadan fast, prayers, and community meals, in the face of comprehensive slave codes that linked religious activity to insubordination and rebellion. Marking Ramadan as a “new American tradition” not only overlooks the holy month observed by enslaved Muslims many years ago, but also perpetuates their erasure from Muslim-American history.

Although the Quran “[a]llows a believer to abstain from fasting if he or she is far from home or involved in strenuous work,” many enslaved Muslims demonstrated transcendent piety by choosing to fast while bonded. In addition to abstaining from food and drink, enslaved Muslims held holy month prayers in slave quarters, and put together iftars - meals at sundown to break the fast - that brought observing Muslims together. These prayers and iftars violated slave codes restricting assembly of any kind.

For instance, the Virginia Slave Code of 1723 considered the assembly of five slaves as an “unlawful and tumultuous meeting”, convened to plot rebellion attempts. Every state in the south codified similar laws barring slave assemblages, which disparately impacted enslaved African Muslims observing the Holy Month.

Therefore, practicing Islam and observing Ramadan and its fundamental rituals, for enslaved Muslims in antebellum America, necessitated the violation of slave codes. This exposed them to barbaric punishment, injury, and oftentimes, even death. However, the courage to observe the holy month while bonded, and in the face of grave risk, highlights the supreme piety of many enslaved Muslims.

Ramadan was widely observed by enslaved Muslims. Yet, this history is largely ignored by Muslim American leaders and laypeople alike - and erased from the modern Muslim American narrative.

Ramadan: A centuries-old American tradition (via simhasanam)

I want everyone to read this. The general (though unspoken) conception is that Ramadan and Islam in general is a religious practice that began in great numbers in the West with the influx of Arab and South Asian immigrants and that is far from the truth and a grave injustice to the contributions of Black Americans. Islam has been here and its foundation began with them.

(via maarnayeri)

(via wrcsolace)

radicalrebellion:

evolutia:

acceber74:

postracialcomments:

Babysitter Robs  4 Year Old, Blames a Black Man, Black Neighbor Falsely Arrested
The girl, who has not been identified because of her age, was babysitting two young kids Wednesday afternoon in Bellingham when she said two armed men forced their way into the home. She told police the men ordered her to leave with the children. She brought them to a neighbor’s house and called 911.Speaking with police, the babysitter said the robbers were tall black men in their 20s or 30s. Numerous deputies and a special response team swarmed into the neighborhood to secure the home and find the robbers. A Customs and Border Protection helicopter was also deployed to help search for the robbers.
The babysitter stuck to her original story for a while, but later cracked under questioning and admitted to lying. She told detectives no one barged into the home and that she was involved in the plan to steal valuables from the house.She said she made up a list of items she wanted and gave it to her two accomplices, who then burglarized the house. Detectives soon identified the two suspected accomplices, one of whom was the babysitter’s boyfriend, 18-year-old Reuben Benjamin, according to deputies. The second was a 16-year-old boy, who deputies have not identified.
Source
The neighbor of Abby’s was falsely accused when the babysitter made up a story about the burglars being black.

Abby, 4, told police that the men where white, not black as the babysitter claimed.

All it takes is words…

This is exactly what people mean when it’s not just “white men,” white women are just as guilty. So many Black men have been put away due to these false accusations or worse.
I don’t think people understand, if a Black person gets anything on a criminal record, we’re done. We can’t do anything, we will not be able to even think about moving up, getting a good job, we’re ruined.

^^Not only that, but this many had a rifle pointed AT him. We KNOW how fucking trigger happy the police are when it comes to Black men. He could have easily been taken out behind this white girl’s false accusation, like SO many other Black men. 

radicalrebellion:

evolutia:

acceber74:

postracialcomments:

Babysitter Robs  4 Year Old, Blames a Black Man, Black Neighbor Falsely Arrested

The girl, who has not been identified because of her age, was babysitting two young kids Wednesday afternoon in Bellingham when she said two armed men forced their way into the home. 

She told police the men ordered her to leave with the children. She brought them to a neighbor’s house and called 911.

Speaking with police, the babysitter said the robbers were tall black men in their 20s or 30s. 

Numerous deputies and a special response team swarmed into the neighborhood to secure the home and find the robbers. A Customs and Border Protection helicopter was also deployed to help search for the robbers.


The babysitter stuck to her original story for a while, but later cracked under questioning and admitted to lying. She told detectives no one barged into the home and that she was involved in the plan to steal valuables from the house.

She said she made up a list of items she wanted and gave it to her two accomplices, who then burglarized the house. Detectives soon identified the two suspected accomplices, one of whom was the babysitter’s boyfriend, 18-year-old Reuben Benjamin, according to deputies. The second was a 16-year-old boy, who deputies have not identified.

Source

The neighbor of Abby’s was falsely accused when the babysitter made up a story about the burglars being black.

Abby, 4, told police that the men where white, not black as the babysitter claimed.

All it takes is words…

This is exactly what people mean when it’s not just “white men,” white women are just as guilty. So many Black men have been put away due to these false accusations or worse.

I don’t think people understand, if a Black person gets anything on a criminal record, we’re done. We can’t do anything, we will not be able to even think about moving up, getting a good job, we’re ruined.

^^Not only that, but this many had a rifle pointed AT him. We KNOW how fucking trigger happy the police are when it comes to Black men. He could have easily been taken out behind this white girl’s false accusation, like SO many other Black men. 

blackmalemodels:

Afrofuturist - Fucking Young! Online

Model: Zelig Wilson

Photographer: Ruud Baan

(via frank-e-shadow-tongue)

dynamicafrica:

The iconic images that came to define the Soweto Uprising of June 16th, 1976.

This series of images depict scenes of a tragic moment that has come to symbolize this day in South African history.

As planned on June 16th, 1976, students from schools around Soweto began to gather and protest against a policy by the South African government that, through a system they called ‘Bantu Education’, that forced black students from the 7th grade onwards to be taught lessons in Afrikaans. Not only was this policy impractical as many students had little to no knowledge in Afrikaans which made learning subjects in high school difficult, Afrikaans was a language that symbolized oppression and the racist authority of the apartheid government.

Armed mostly with their new found confidence and attitudes of defiance cultivated by the Black Consciousness rhetoric sweeping the country, the students had planned that these protests would be a peaceful demonstration. The mass rally had been planned in secret by the Students formed an Action Committee (later known as the Soweto Students’ Representative Council) on June 13th, 1976, with student Teboho “Tsietsi” Mashinini as the main leader of the protests.

On the day, between 10, 000 - 50, 000 students began to make their way, as planned, to the Orlando Stadium in Soweto. Many of the participants were only notified of the rally on the day of the event. According to his sister, Antoinette Sithole, 13-year-old Hector Pieterson found himself there more out of curiosity out of anything else. Unfortunately, it was at this time that things began to take a violent turn. Police, who were heavily armed, began releasing their dogs on the crowds. But the crowd was large and many protestors overpowered the animals. After this, the police began to shoot into the crowd of unarmed students. One of the first causalities recorded on that day was the young Hector Pieterson.  

More and more victims were killed on that day, and one such individual was Dr. Melville Edelstein, a white social worker in Soweto who had devoted his life to providing healthcare to many in the area. Unfortunately, Dr. Edelstein was the “victim of the consequences of the apartheid system – a racist system which socialized South Africans to impulsively judge and respond to one another not as individuals with individual qualities, but according to a stereotypical image based solely on skin colour.”

Taken by South African photographer Sam Nzima, the first image was published in newspapers around the world the following day and has become one of the most iconic images of South African history.

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