An NPR article of how a woman was forced to strip and be examined in front of a judge and jury to prove that she could not hide her blackness

(via afrodyke)

elektrotacker:

arabellesicardi:

blackdenimjeans:

soulrevision:

You WILL want to watch this.

In the early morning hours on 8/16/2014 in Ferguson, MO, Greg Thomas spoke with VICE about Ferguson, structural racism, media bias and more!!!

Please reblog & signal boost so we can get this truth out!!

Greg Thomas can be found on twitter, here: Minossec

#Ferguson #MikeBrown

Mess at this being a vice interview important still though

i saw this live and was screaming about it on twitter. he’s the best. this is a graduate level seminar on media & partisanship. this is 4 years of journalism classes in 7 minutes. 

Fascinating on the scene analysis

(via that-misery-chick)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Joana Choumali

Hââbre, the last generation

1. Ms. Djeneba : ” I used to like my scars; they were beautiful. We used to brag about them. But, now, in the city, it is definitely out of fashion.”

2. Mrs. Sinou : “I refuse to do it to my children. This will stay on my face only.”

3.Mr. Konabé : “Our parents did this not to get lost in life. When you went somewhere, you could not get lost.”

4. Mr. Lawal : “It is here in town that I am ‘nobody’. In the village, I am a noble; people bow down when they see my face! I am proud of that.”

5. Mr. Salbre : “ I do not want this for my children. We are the last generation “

6. Ms. Martine : “When I was 10 years, I asked for them. I wanted to be like my brothers and sisters, and to show that I am courageous. “ 

7. Mr. Guemi : “I already wear my identity card on my face. This is the reason why people did it : to recognize one another. But now, this is over. We can no more be recognized.”

Website

(via wherethequeerthingsare)

k-popvevo:

So this is my new favorite GIF!

image

I’m gonna use it every time white people try to speak. For example, “Why can’t I say ni—”

image

"You’re cute for a bla—"

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"You look so ghe—"

image

"My great grandfather was an Irish sl—"

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"I was called a honky one time! White people experience raci—"

image

"Stop talking about race! We’re all hu—"

image

"Rever—"

image

(via decolonize-all-the-things)

eshusplayground:

chillona:

It really doesn’t make sense that we’re the first to die in movies, when we’re the first to skedaddle out of a scary ass situation.

Consider this your Public Service Announcement.

I will not stick around. I will not nobly sacrifice myself. I will not help.

africandiasporaphd:

Gaspar Yanga’s Statue in the Town Named After Him (Erasmo Vasquez Lendechy)
North America’s 1st Black Town? by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

… many of the first African slaves who arrived in the New World before 1620 landed in Mexico, which is a surprise to most of us living in the United States. By 1570, the year that a slave named Gaspar Yanga fled to the mountains near Veracruz to escape slavery, the colony of New Spain (as Mexico was called) “had received an estimated 36,500 Africans,” the historian Herman Bennett tells us in his book, Africans in Colonial Mexico, “of which 20,000 had survived." 

Moreover, by 1600, Bennett concludes, the number of Africans “collectively rivaled, if not outnumbered, Spaniards throughout New Spain.” And at Veracruz, “persons of African descent constituted 63 percent of the nonindigenous population.” 


By 1810, Bennett continues, free blacks “numbered approximately 624,000, or 10 percent of the total population.” Bennett correctly observes that the fact that Mexico by this time was “home to the second-largest slave and the largest free black populations may come as a revelation to those unaccustomed to thinking of Mexico as a prominent site of the African presence.” Most Americans will find these facts astonishing. I know that I did when I first learned of them.




Mexico’s African population traditionally was concentrated along its two coasts, one around the port of Veracruz (where most of the slaves landed) on the Gulf of Mexico, and the other in a district known as the Costa Chica, on the Pacific Ocean near Acapulco. And it was near Veracruz that the first black-ruled town was granted its status as a self-governing municipality by Spain in 1609, 11 years before the Mayflower. It is called Yanga, and a large statue of its founder graces the town square today.

The town of Yanga is named for Mexico’s most famous runaway slave, Gaspar Yanga, whom the historian Jane Landers tells us in her book Slaves, Subjects, and Subversives: Blacks in Colonial Latin America was “an enslaved West African of the Bran nation.” In 1570 or so, Yanga escaped from his enslavement near Veracruz and formed a “palenque” (a community of runaway slaves, or “maroons”) in the mountains nearby at Cofre de Perote. Yanga’s palenque survived illegally for almost 40 years, “raiding Spanish convoys along the Camino Real [Royal Road] to Ciudad Mexico [Mexico City] and nearby haciendas.” 


By 1609, the Spanish authorities had had enough. The Viceroy, Luis de Velasco II, mounted a major assault on the settlement, but to no avail. Under the leadership of an Angolan named Francisco de la Matosa, Yanga and his compatriots successfully defended themselves and then negotiated a settlement with the Spanish.
Read more.

africandiasporaphd:

Gaspar Yanga’s Statue in the Town Named After Him (Erasmo Vasquez Lendechy)

North America’s 1st Black Town? by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

… many of the first African slaves who arrived in the New World before 1620 landed in Mexico, which is a surprise to most of us living in the United States. By 1570, the year that a slave named Gaspar Yanga fled to the mountains near Veracruz to escape slavery, the colony of New Spain (as Mexico was called) “had received an estimated 36,500 Africans,” the historian Herman Bennett tells us in his book, Africans in Colonial Mexico, “of which 20,000 had survived.

Moreover, by 1600, Bennett concludes, the number of Africans “collectively rivaled, if not outnumbered, Spaniards throughout New Spain.” And at Veracruz, “persons of African descent constituted 63 percent of the nonindigenous population.” 

By 1810, Bennett continues, free blacks “numbered approximately 624,000, or 10 percent of the total population.” Bennett correctly observes that the fact that Mexico by this time was “home to the second-largest slave and the largest free black populations may come as a revelation to those unaccustomed to thinking of Mexico as a prominent site of the African presence.” Most Americans will find these facts astonishing. I know that I did when I first learned of them.

Mexico’s African population traditionally was concentrated along its two coasts, one around the port of Veracruz (where most of the slaves landed) on the Gulf of Mexico, and the other in a district known as the Costa Chica, on the Pacific Ocean near Acapulco. And it was near Veracruz that the first black-ruled town was granted its status as a self-governing municipality by Spain in 1609, 11 years before the Mayflower. It is called Yanga, and a large statue of its founder graces the town square today.

The town of Yanga is named for Mexico’s most famous runaway slave, Gaspar Yanga, whom the historian Jane Landers tells us in her book Slaves, Subjects, and Subversives: Blacks in Colonial Latin America was “an enslaved West African of the Bran nation.” In 1570 or so, Yanga escaped from his enslavement near Veracruz and formed a “palenque” (a community of runaway slaves, or “maroons”) in the mountains nearby at Cofre de Perote. Yanga’s palenque survived illegally for almost 40 years, “raiding Spanish convoys along the Camino Real [Royal Road] to Ciudad Mexico [Mexico City] and nearby haciendas.” 

By 1609, the Spanish authorities had had enough. The Viceroy, Luis de Velasco II, mounted a major assault on the settlement, but to no avail. Under the leadership of an Angolan named Francisco de la Matosa, Yanga and his compatriots successfully defended themselves and then negotiated a settlement with the Spanish.

Read more.

ageekyfemmeforeveringlasses:

ardora:

“I’m black… They never let me forget it. I’m black alright… I’ll never let them forget it.” 
— Jack Johnson, the first black Heavyweight Champion of the World (1878-1946)  (via)


lol I love his stance.

ageekyfemmeforeveringlasses:

ardora:

“I’m black… They never let me forget it. I’m black alright… I’ll never let them forget it.” 

— Jack Johnson, the first black Heavyweight Champion of the World (1878-1946)  (via)

lol I love his stance.

jcoleknowsbest:

KATANGA’S FORGOTTEN CHILDREN

During the 1970s, an increased demand for copper and cobalt attracted Japanese investments in the mineral-rich southeastern region of Katanga Province. Over a 10-year period, more than 1,000 Japanese miners relocated to the region, confined to a strictly male-only camp. Arriving without family or spouses, the men often sought social interaction outside the confounds of their camps. In search of intimacy with the opposite sex, sometimes resulting in cohabitation, the men openly engaged in interracial dating and relationships, a practice mostly embraced by the local society. As a result, a number of Japanese miners fathered children with native Congolese women. However, most of the mixed race infants resulting from these unions died, soon after birth. Multiple testimonies of local people suggest that the infants were poisoned by a Japanese lead physician and nurse working at the local mining hospital. Subsequently, the circumstances would have brought the miners shame as most of them already had families back in their native Japan. The practice forced many native Katangan mothers to hide their children by not reporting to the hospital to give birth.

Today, fifty Afro-Japanese have formed an association of Katanga Infanticide survivors. The organization has hired legal council seeking a formal investigation into the killings. The group submitted official inquiry to both the Congolese and Japanese governments, to no avail. Issues specific to this group include having no documentation of their births, since not having been born in the local hospital spared their lives. The total number of survivors is unknown

Source

I really need y’all to understand that black people have no friends…..

(via afrodyke)

twitter.com/AlienBodies

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