yech00la:

alexknowsbestest:

jamaicanfemmefatale:

halfpiintxx:

journeytosugar:

sylviabloodbath:

aideyn:

diasporadash:

kemetically-afrolatino:

xpsycho:

eatimitationcrab:

setbabiesonfire:

Sgt. Thomas McVicar of the Jersey City Police Department shot 22 year old Kwadir Felton, leaving him blind, after Kwadir pulled a gun on him, he claims. Kwadir Felton denied the accusation, stating that he doesn’t even carry guns.

"I don’t understand!" Felton yelled at a police officer before his mother was removed from the courtroom. "You didn’t have to shoot me in the head for no reason! You trying to charge me with something I didn’t do!"

Sign the Change.org petition and get this story out there.

SIGN THE PETITION. Still at least 1,000 signatures needed. SIGNAL BOOST THIS or i will judge you.

i posted this story about 2 weeks ago and i’m glad it’s gotten so popular. now the petition which i didn’t know about then, has tens of thousands of signatures!

sign the petition! signal boost Justice for Kwedir Felton!

THIS IS THE SHIT WE’RE STILL DEALING WITH. I am sick to my stomach.

http://www.nj.com/jjournal-news/index.ssf/2013/11/kwadir_feltons_attorney_files.html

Sounds like the officer keeps changing his story about what he did with the gun after he shot a fucking human being in the god damn face. Sounds guilty as all fuck.

From what I could find on the .gov site, it looks like the drug charges could stick, it doesn’t mention if Felton was a known associate of those who were selling the drugs.

All the details on the gov site seem super broad strokes, it all smells off to me. http://www.nj.gov/oag/newsreleases11/pr20110519c.html

Petition signed. This needs to be looked at fucking hard. This smells like bullshit to me.

Reblogging again because of aideyn’s additional commentary.

Signed, sealed delivered, I’m pissed.

SIGNED IDC WHO YOU ARE< WHAT KIND OF BLOG YOU GOT

please reblog this Only need 7,722 more 

fight for justice - WE CONTROL WHAT HAPPENS IN OUR COUNTRY 

sounds like bullshit. Signed. IDC who you are yo need to take 10 mins out of your day to read a little and sign this. So much damn hate and prejudice in this world its pathetic.

Only needs 239 more petitions signed 

(via kyssthis16)

crownprince81:

odinsblog:

The way that the Stand Your Ground statute is used in jury instructions boils down to this: ALL THAT ANY NON-BLACK SHOOTER NEEDS TO DO IS TO SAY THAT THEY WERE AFRAID FOR THEIR LIFE…because scary Black person. It matters very little if the so-called “reasonable fear” existed in reality, or only in someone’s mind, or not at all

Newsflash: ANY given reason =/= “reasonable fear”

I’ve sat on a jury as a foreman before, and please believe me when I say…during deliberations in the jury room, “reasonable” can easily become, “well, he did give a reason for his fear" if someone strong (or Black) isn’t there to immediately shoot that thought process down

Here is the complete text of the Florida #SYG statute (written by ALEC, btw) which ultimately finds it’s way into Florida’s self defense (aka #SYG) jury instructions

But here’s how the interpretation plays out:

image

Make no mistake: Dunn didn’t use the words ‘gangster’ and ‘thug’ in his testimony by mistake. You don’t have to look any further than the glaring difference between how Richard Sherman was derided and pilloried as a “thug” vs. when White people like Mayor Rob Ford and Michael Grimm (R-NY) aren’t even arrested after being caught on film using drugs or making credible death threats, let alone not called a thug. Those two words—thug and gangster—and many more have become heavily weaponized and racialized, and they are ‘polite’ stand ins for the n-word. And that coded language didn’t just happen all on it’s own

And let’s be real here, for far too many armed White people, unfamiliar Black bodies are plenty of reason to be fearful…all the way to the point of immediately applying lethal force (please see also: implicit shooter bias, Renisha McBride, Jonathan Ferrell, etcetc, etc, etc, etc)

This has to stop

Black lives don’t matter. People can use any excuse in the world to kill us. Don’t smile or speak cause they may use that to kill you too.

(via decolonize-all-the-things)

fogo-av:

dear-white-people:

YOU DEMANDED IT! Check out the full-length official trailer for Dear White People before it hits theaters this weekend. 

#HITSHARE #TURNUP #BELIEVETHEHYPE

This movie better be everything that I need it to be or else! 

(via decolonize-all-the-things)

babybutta:

dynastylnoire:

nyamennwunamawu:

takeonthestorm:

gang0fwolves:

thelastblackman:

No future at Hampton University

Hampton University bans dreadlocks and cornrows (MBA program).


brainwash,                 institutionalize,           sellout,  

self-hatred,      stupid                     ignorant         culturally ignorant

                                  racism                  black on black  

I am re-blogging this because just knowing about it is not enough, contact information for Hampton University. Do what Malcolm would have done

757-727-5000 

because being black is seen as being unprofessional

Because Hampton aint the real HU.

Oop.

^^

because new black was never new

THIS IS A FUCKING MESSAGE TO WHITE PEOPLE WANTING TO DO LOCS AND BE APART OF THE NATURAL HAIR MOVEMENT.

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public 
BGLH writes:
“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.
“WOW. Really?” I replied.
I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.
With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.
Read more here.

heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public

BGLH writes:

“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.

“WOW. Really?” I replied.

I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.

With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.

Read more here.

(via dynamicafrica)

dynamicafrica:

Speakers For The Dead: Documentary about the original black settlers of Priceville, Ontario Canada.

When Irish settlers first moved to the area now known as Priceville in Ontario Canada, to their surprise, they found a community of black people already living there.

This documentary reveals some of the hidden history of black people in Canada.

In the 1930s in rural Ontario, a farmer buried the tombstones of a black cemetery to make way for a potato patch. In the 1980s, descendants of the original settlers, Black and White, came together to restore the cemetery, but there were hidden truths no one wanted to discuss.

Deep racial wounds were opened. Scenes of the cemetery excavation, interviews with residents and re-enactments—including one of a baseball game where a broken headstone is used for home plate—add to the film’s emotional intensity.

By Jennifer Holness, & David Sutherland, 2000

wocinsolidarity:

lightspeedsound:

Bethann Hardison on racism in the fashion industry.

From About Face: Supermodels then and now

"the word aesthetic is borderline racist at this point"

(via yrmomschesthair)

Social scientists estimate that 15 to 30 percent, or, “[a]s many as 600,000 to 1.2 million slaves” in antebellum America were Muslims. 46 percent of the slaves in the antebellum South were kidnapped from Africa’s western regions, which boasted “significant numbers of Muslims”.

These enslaved Muslims strove to meet the demands of their faith, most notably the Ramadan fast, prayers, and community meals, in the face of comprehensive slave codes that linked religious activity to insubordination and rebellion. Marking Ramadan as a “new American tradition” not only overlooks the holy month observed by enslaved Muslims many years ago, but also perpetuates their erasure from Muslim-American history.

Although the Quran “[a]llows a believer to abstain from fasting if he or she is far from home or involved in strenuous work,” many enslaved Muslims demonstrated transcendent piety by choosing to fast while bonded. In addition to abstaining from food and drink, enslaved Muslims held holy month prayers in slave quarters, and put together iftars - meals at sundown to break the fast - that brought observing Muslims together. These prayers and iftars violated slave codes restricting assembly of any kind.

For instance, the Virginia Slave Code of 1723 considered the assembly of five slaves as an “unlawful and tumultuous meeting”, convened to plot rebellion attempts. Every state in the south codified similar laws barring slave assemblages, which disparately impacted enslaved African Muslims observing the Holy Month.

Therefore, practicing Islam and observing Ramadan and its fundamental rituals, for enslaved Muslims in antebellum America, necessitated the violation of slave codes. This exposed them to barbaric punishment, injury, and oftentimes, even death. However, the courage to observe the holy month while bonded, and in the face of grave risk, highlights the supreme piety of many enslaved Muslims.

Ramadan was widely observed by enslaved Muslims. Yet, this history is largely ignored by Muslim American leaders and laypeople alike - and erased from the modern Muslim American narrative.

Ramadan: A centuries-old American tradition (via simhasanam)

I want everyone to read this. The general (though unspoken) conception is that Ramadan and Islam in general is a religious practice that began in great numbers in the West with the influx of Arab and South Asian immigrants and that is far from the truth and a grave injustice to the contributions of Black Americans. Islam has been here and its foundation began with them.

(via maarnayeri)

(via wrcsolace)

twitter.com/AlienBodies

view archive



Call for Papers

Conference Website

Ask me anything

Submit